Understanding how chlamydia impacts on the fallopian tube

There is a new paper in Fertility and Sterility (Fertil Steril. 2012 Aug 7. [Epub ahead of print) in that offers an excellent review of the mechanism of action of chlamydia on the Fallopian tube – what we know and where the gaps are in our knowledge. It is a review of the literature – so rather than summarise the paper here – we advise you to read it where is can be accessed on PUBmed.

The paper outlines how complex the mechanisms are that can lead to tubal infertility. It also describes how knockout mouse models can be used to study tubal function in the hope of better understanding how chlamydia impacts on tubal motility and implantation .

 

Professor Tom Bourne

Professor Tom Bourne is Adjunct Professor at Imperial College London, and Consultant Gynaecologist at Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital. He is also visiting Professor at KU Leuven, Belgium. He has extensive clinical and research experience in early pregnancy care as well as gynaecological ultrasound. He has published over 300 academic papers with an H-index of 63. He advises NICE, is trustee of the ectopic pregnancy trust, President of the UK association of early pregnancy units (AEPU) and on the board of ISUOG. He has a private practice at The Women's Ultrasound Centres at 86 Harley Street and Parkside Hospital in Wimbledon.

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About Professor Tom Bourne

Professor Tom Bourne is Adjunct Professor at Imperial College London, and Consultant Gynaecologist at Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital. He is also visiting Professor at KU Leuven, Belgium. He has extensive clinical and research experience in early pregnancy care as well as gynaecological ultrasound. He has published over 300 academic papers with an H-index of 63. He advises NICE, is trustee of the ectopic pregnancy trust, President of the UK association of early pregnancy units (AEPU) and on the board of ISUOG. He has a private practice at The Women's Ultrasound Centres at 86 Harley Street and Parkside Hospital in Wimbledon.
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