What causes ectopic pregnancy?

We believe that pregnancies implant in the Fallopian tube because of a combination of factors: a failure of the mechanisms which move the pregnancy along the Fallopian tube into the womb and a change in the environment in the Fallopian tube that allows early implantation to occur.

We also know that some things make you more at risk of having an ectopic pregnancy. If you’ve had previous abdominal surgery (for example, your appendix removed or a caesarean section) your risk is said to be increased up to 4 times. If you’ve had a sexually transmitted infection like Chlamydia, then your risk is increased up to 2 and 3 times. If you’re a smoker again your risk is increased between 2 and 3 times. And interestingly, if you’ve had fertility treatment, such as IVF, then your risk is increased as well.

How these risk factors cause ectopic pregnancy is something that we don’t really understand, but we’ve been doing research on this in Edinburgh.

See link: www.ectopic.org.uk/index.php/press/press-releases.

Andrew Horne

Andrew Horne is senior clinical lecturer and consultant gynaecologist at the MRC Centre for Reproductive Heath in Edinburgh. He is an MRC-funded clinician scientist with a research interest in Fallopian tube, endometrial and peritoneal biology. His aim is to further understanding of the causes of ectopic pregnancy, develop a blood test to better diagnose the condition, and investigate novel methods for imaging and treating ectopic pregnancy. In addition, he leads a multidisciplinary team that manages women with chronic pelvic pain and endometriosis. He is currently identifying candidate urinary markers for diagnosing endometriosis, attempting to understand the aetiology of endometriosis and evaluating drugs for the management of chronic pelvic pain.

More Posts

About Andrew Horne

Andrew Horne is senior clinical lecturer and consultant gynaecologist at the MRC Centre for Reproductive Heath in Edinburgh. He is an MRC-funded clinician scientist with a research interest in Fallopian tube, endometrial and peritoneal biology. His aim is to further understanding of the causes of ectopic pregnancy, develop a blood test to better diagnose the condition, and investigate novel methods for imaging and treating ectopic pregnancy. In addition, he leads a multidisciplinary team that manages women with chronic pelvic pain and endometriosis. He is currently identifying candidate urinary markers for diagnosing endometriosis, attempting to understand the aetiology of endometriosis and evaluating drugs for the management of chronic pelvic pain.
This entry was posted in Diagnosis and treatment, New research, News and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

HTML tags are not allowed.