What should I do about an abnormal smear in pregnancy?

We don’t usually take smears in pregnancy but sometimes a smear is taken before you realise you are pregnant. At other times you may have had an abnormal smear before the pregnancy and your doctors may want to keep a check on things whilst you are pregnant. An abnormal smear in pregnancy can be easily managed without causing any harm to the pregnancy.

If the smear shows a very low grade abnormality, technically called “borderline nuclear atypia,” we would usually recommend repeating the smear in 6 months time. In pregnancy this can be left safely until 3 months after delivery, if this is your first abnormal smear and you have had regular smears up until then.

If the smear shows any other abnormality we recommend colposcopy. This just means having a careful look at the cervix with magnification and will not harm the pregnancy. A biopsy is not usually necessary during pregnancy. Depending upon the abnormality your doctor may suggest you have further colposcopies during pregnancy but usually we leave treatment until about three months after delivery.

The most important thing is not to get too worried by the smear result but just to follow the advice you are given and get it checked out.

Angus McIndoe

Angus McIndoe has over 20 years experience in the NHS and Private sectors to call on. He is one of the foremost UK consultants working in the field of Gynaecological Oncology and was one of the first RCOG accredited gynaecological oncologists in the UK. He also carries out robotic surgery at the Wellington Hospital in London. Angus is a fully accredited colposcopist by the BSCCP/RCOG combined programme and an expert in dealing with abnormal smears. He runs a rapid assessment service in Harley Street with Professor Tom Bourne for women with symptoms or worries that they may have gynaecological cancer.

More Posts - Website

About Angus McIndoe

Angus McIndoe has over 20 years experience in the NHS and Private sectors to call on. He is one of the foremost UK consultants working in the field of Gynaecological Oncology and was one of the first RCOG accredited gynaecological oncologists in the UK. He also carries out robotic surgery at the Wellington Hospital in London. Angus is a fully accredited colposcopist by the BSCCP/RCOG combined programme and an expert in dealing with abnormal smears. He runs a rapid assessment service in Harley Street with Professor Tom Bourne for women with symptoms or worries that they may have gynaecological cancer.
This entry was posted in Diagnosis, Diagnosis and treatment, Media stories, New research and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

HTML tags are not allowed.